All posts by Teri Muse

RYLA

June 16, 2017 Program Report
by Waste Management Student Intern Keanny Jimenez

The 2017 RYLA students did the honors of running our club meeting for the day. RYLA is a camp for teenagers to learn leadership skills and grow as a person. The camp provided activities and guest speakers that help with leadership skills. Some activities included using fake money to purchase supplies to devise a way for an egg dropped from a two-story building and not crack when it hit the concrete floor. Another example was building a firetruck from Lego’s with one person looking at the firetruck and then describing it to the other camper so they could build it sight unseen. This activity helped them keep calm under stress and frustration.
However, they didn’t only have activities they also had guest speakers and comedians. Kathy was one of the comedians who was also deaf but kept everyone rolling around in laughter. Her jokes soon turned into a motivational speech. Kathy oozed with confidence and wanted the rest of the teenagers to radiate from that. Another speaker was “Bruce Almighty” whose theme was the decisions we make affect us. He had lost his daughter in a car accident and described how the decisions we make can affect not only us but our families.
The students from Arcadia High School had strong feelings about the camp. Many were nervous on the first day, not knowing what to expect of this camp. They soon realized the camp was filled with charismatic and welcoming people. They made friends from different places and created strong bonds with them. The camp challenged them into breaking out of their comfort zone by talking about stereotypes, race unfairness, and other kinds of problems. They were surrounded by mature and understanding young adults which helped them open emotionally and mentally. RYLA helped empower and accept their vulnerabilities and view that as an advantage instead of an obstacle.

Our Very Own Magicians

It all began in May 2016 when Rosie asked Frank Hall to be program chair. Frank said only if Ken Chan will do a magic show. Ken Chan said only if Gina Post-Franco will join him and then the dynamic duo of Ken and Gina was created for us to enjoy one year later when they both performed magic tricks at our club meeting.

Gina was introduced to magic when she was 5 and has been a member of the Magic Castle for more than 20 years. She enlisted the help of her two adorable sons Dylan and Reese who helped her with a rope trick, which even though it was verified to be an authentic rope by Larry Callaham, Gina was able to cut it into many pieces only to put it back together again. Rosie Mares was stumped to learn the card she picked from a deck of cards with a hole in them and handcuffed shut, magically appeared in a sealed envelope on the podium. Glen O’Young unknowingly became the object of the funniest trick ever. Gina used a balloon to draw Glen’s face on then stick a skewer thru it to prove there was nothing between Glen’s ears!

Ken warmed up the crowd by asking Patricia Hall to be his assistant, which she did beautifully. Ken asked her to pick a card from one deck of cards and Ken then picked the same card from another deck of cards! We learned that Ken has been a member of the Magic Castle for more than 20 years and is quite the performer. His jokes mixed with magic created just a moment of panic when he asked Teri Muse and Imy Dulake to remove their wedding rings and place them on two shoestrings and a pencil. Wondering if he was going to make them disappear, much to the ladies relief, he tied the strings into a knot and somehow was able to slide the rings off like there was not knot at all. His showmanship and sense of humor was highlighted when he had Ernie Jensen be the toilet paper holder and Jim Rider, Mike Ojeda, Mike Hoey, Bob Hoffman and Brad Miller do a Rockette’s high kicking dance, wiggle their booty’s, and chew toilet paper while Ken was able to pull a string of colored paper out of his mouth. The real trick was Ken got all those guys to chew toilet paper!

April 7-Programs Report

“Making a Difference.”  That’s the 2018 theme for the Rose Parade as reported by Lance Tibett, President of the Tournament of Roses.  The theme is to celebrate all people in our communities that always step forward when others step back and help enrich the lives of others.  Lance said they have not selected the Grand Marshall yet.

Some Rose Parade/Rose Bowl trivia:

  • Rotary has had 46 entries in the Rose Parade with the first Rotary float entered in 1927.
  • There was a break in time and now there has been 39 years of continuous entries by Rotary International.
  • The Rose Parade is 129 years old.
  • The first Rose Bowl was held in 1902 to raise money for the parade but did not hold another Rose Bowl until 1916 due to concerns about “shenanigins” going on in college football.
  • For a while, there were chariot races instead of football games.  Anita Baldwin had several successful Chariot runs in the Rose Bowl.
  • The Rose Parade costs $17 million to put on each year.
  • Tournament of Roses has given $1 billion to Big10/Pac12 schools over the years. Any money received from ESPN for televising the event is divided equally among all the schools.
  • Tournament of Roses Foundation gives about $200,000 per year in grants to non-profits

Lance also talked about how they are talking with Disney and the entertainment industry to bid on a national championship game at the Rose Bowl.  So stay tuned!

LEAP

Charlie Gallagher, Executive Director

Building our future leaders now….that’s the message Charlie Gallagher from the LEAP program brought to our meeting. This week-long, award-winning motivational leadership program for 15-25 year old students takes place on the UCLA campus each Summer. Charlie is an alumni of the program when it first started in 2008 and returned to take over as Executive Director after working in Australia in Advertising.
LEAP teaches real word skills like study skills, time management, financial management, effective communication, goal setting, working with mentors and networking. Students must apply for the program and scholarships are available. The cost for the week-long program is $3,000.
Two key components that LEAP students leave the program with are access to real life mentors in their career field and motivated peers who are friends for life, serving as a support system. The program offers a track for high school students who are excelling in high school but need help getting into their ideal college. It also offers a college/career prep program to help students transition into the real world and succeed in their first job. Many graduates of the LEAP program return to mentor the students each year and past speakers include Mayor Eric Garcetti, Actress Eva Longoria, Olympic medalist Apollo One, NFL Hall of Famer Michael Strahan and singer, dancer, actress Paula Abdul.
For more information call (877) 855-5327 or visit www.LEAPfoundation.com.

90 Minutes That Can Change A Child’s Life

Rotoplast
Programs Report for January 6, 2017

Former District Governor Roger Schulte who is the District 5300 leader for the 2017 Rotoplast Mission to Lima, Peru showed us how 90 minutes can forever change the life of a child with cleft lip or palette. The pictures in his presentation from his past mission to Retalhuleu, Guatemala were worth a thousand words as we saw how these children and their families were suffering from this birth defect. Lips turned inside out with teeth sticking out in all directions showed how cleft palette and lip can effect a child’s ability to swallow, nurse as an infant, hear and speak.

Roger explained how Rotary has been conducting these missions for over 24 years, visiting 26 countries and serving over 17,000 children. Over a two- week period a team of 25, including medical and non-medical volunteers serve in capacities from registration, medical assessment, supply chain, pre and post op to photo journalist work with the local Rotary clubs in these countries to serve as many children as possible. Some people travel up to 14 hours just to get to the location of the Rotoplast project in hopes of receiving this life-changing operation.

Each Rotoplast can cost over $90,000 which are mainly funded thru individual donations. Money is the most crucial thing needed to continue these missions. If you would like to donate or are interested in volunteering go to the Rotoplast website at www.rotoplast.org.

Evolution of Recycling

Evolution of Recycling
Mike Hammer, Director of Recycling Operations
Waste Management

You could hear a pin drop in Jordan Hall at the Church of the Good Shepherd last Friday, when Mike Hammer, Director of Recycling Operations for Waste Management took to the podium to shed some light on the evolution of recycling. Rotarians were captivated by Mike’s enlightening presentation.

Mike explained how chemically, something can be recyclable but in order for it to be recycled, there needs to be a way to collect and process the recyclables so there is little if no contamination of food waste and most importantly an end market to buy the recyclable material. Those three factors coupled with new packaging and consumer behavior is reducing the amount of recyclables being disposed.

Laundry soap used to be in big plastic bottles and is now in a small pouch with pods of detergent, all of which is not recyclable. Tuna used to be in a tin can and now is available in a pouch. Also, what is recyclable like plastic water bottles are being made much more light weight, meaning it takes a whole lot more water bottles to make up a ton of recyclables. Since 2005, the weight of a plastic bottle has been reduced by 37%. It now takes 35,000 more water bottles to make up a ton. Also, with the internet, most newspapers on now being read online, greatly reducing the amount of newspaper in the recycle stream. So even though packaging size is reducing and becoming more lightweight, the cost to process these recyclables remains the same or increases. In many cases, it is cheaper to make the product from virgin materials than to make it from recycled materials.

Across the country, many states are adopted goals of how much material they want diverted from their landfills, with California setting a goal of 75% reduction by 2020. Today, we have reached diversion of the most common materials such as paper, cardboard, plastic, tin, aluminum and glass. The next step is to divert organic waste such as food and green waste which is more difficult and costly. American consumers, businesses, and farms spend $218 billion a year, or 1.8% of GDP growing, processing, transporting, and disposing of food that is never eaten. 52 Millions tons of food is sent to landfills annually – 21% of landfill volume.
If the diversion goals are not reached, the State will look to trying to divert much more complicated materials such as the small pouch packaging which is usually contaminated with food residue. Most recycling facilities in the United States today are not designed to handle this type of product. This is why we must all do our part to be diligent in recycling the most basic items: paper, cardboard, plastics of all sorts except plastic bags, metals and glass.